Fashion Revue Competition Contest Guidelines

Garment Contest Details:

Contest is open to any created wearable garment – whether it be sewn, knitted or crocheted.  Garments shall be worn by the 4-H member and shown off during a walk down the runway.  Judging will be based on appearance and presentation – such as modeling skills, coordination of total look, overall fit, fabric choices, accessories, etc.

Non-garment Contest Details:

Contest is open to any non-garment item – whether it is a sewing project, knitted or crocheted.  Non-garment items will be presented by the 4-H member during a walk down the runway. Judging will be based on appearance and presentation of the item – such as modeling skills, appropriate patterns, coordination of total look and how the item is shown off in a runway scenario (for example - we had a member show off a dog bed by walking the runway with her dog).

Buymanship Contest Details:

NEW THIS YEAR! As an alternate to the Ready to Wear competition which featured side-by-side comparisons of purchased items, we will be starting a Buymanship section of the Fashion Review.  Buymanship is a project in many other states which teaches 4-H members to make good choices when choosing clothing and accessories.  The full project teaches ways to comparison shop, how to fill out your wardrobe, and choose appropriate clothes for age, figure type and available funds.  As a mini project for fashion review, you will be asked to put together an outfit that contains as least ONE new outer garment item (purchased, gifted, or made by someone else) and model a full outfit with accessories on the runway -as well as filling out a Cost Per Wear form to determine the financial cost of your item(s).  Judging will be based on general appearance, suitability of the outfit for the occasion, appropriate accessories/additional clothing, and the cost per wear form.

Cost Per Wear Form

Did you find an awesome, funky jacket at the thrift store for a great deal or did you spend more on a nicer piece because you can wear it with everything? Ladies – did you do such a great job on your Sweetheart or Prom outfit that you want to show the whole thing off again?  These are all great reasons to enter in Buymanship!

More information about Buymanship in general, in order to help you make appropriate choices, can be found as follows:

Buymanship Project

Wardrobe Planning Packet is available from the Ravalli County Extension Office, email request: ravalli@montana.edu

Good fit means that when a garment is viewed on someone it looks attractive from all sides, without pulls, gaps, or folds. It is essential that each and every item be tried on to determine the fit before purchasing. Check the view from the back as well as the front. Test fit by sitting, walking, bending, stretching, or reaching. Always wear good undergarments. Properly fitted undergarments create a clean and smooth fit.

Fashion Fit Tips
The suggestions below should help you prepare for the fashion revue.
Girls
*Proper foundation garments should be worn but not seen.
*Shoe heel height should be appropriate for skirt length.
*Accessories should add to the total look for the outfit and not create a competing second look.
*Slips should always be worn with skirts.
*Proper undergarments would be worn.

Boys
*When wearing pants with belt loops, always wear a belt. Belts just make an outfit look polished and well put together.
*Jacket Length - sleeve length should come to the bony knot on the wrist when the arm is
down at the side. Shirt cuffs should be ½ inch longer than thumbs when arms are down.
*Slacks - back of hem should touch back of sole and angle up in front. Pant hem should
break at top of shoe. Cuffed slacks are straight. Straight slacks should always have
longer break in front than cuffed slacks.
*Boots are only appropriate if they suit the style of the garment.
*Older boys (over 11) should wear hand-tied ties. No clip-ons.
*Tie tacks should be worn if appropriate.
*Don’t wear both a belt and suspenders.
*Belts should match your shoes.
*Socks should match your trousers.
*Button top button only on suit jacket.


Practice modeling in your complete outfit so you will
feel comfortable and confident.
Shoes need not be new but should be clean and recently polished.
Props should appear natural. Should not take away from the outfit.

A big thank you to the Extension Agents from Finney County, Kansas and the K-State Frontier District for letting us use your existing buymanship materials instead of starting from scratch!

Fashion Runway Walk for Garment, Non-garment and Buymanship:

Participants will be asked to walk, model, and appropriately show off their items on the “red carpet” runway.  A description of your project will be read by the announcer as you walk, which you will have completed in advance (please see the examples attached for how to write a commentary and how to model!). Each participant will be asked a few questions by the judges based on their work and appearance on the runway.

Please write a complete and final script (this will be read word for word at the 4-H Public Fashion Revue). TYPE OR PRINT CLEARLY.
The script (75-90 words in length) should include:
1.  4-H’ers First and Last Name
2.  4-H Age (or Years in 4-H)
3.  4-H Club
4.  Name of School (optional)
5.  Division: Constructed, Buymanship Young Women, or Buymanship Young Men
6.  Description of the outfit (may include fabric content, style details, accessories, fashion trends and/or what you like about this outfit)
6.  Share one thing about you (special hobby, interest, accomplishment or community service)


Samples of Scripts
4-Her’s name learned how to make her sewing machine sing as a first-year member of the sewing project. She constructed this fun tunic made of a turquoise and purple butterfly print. Name, who is 10-years-old and a second-year member of the Oxford Hustlers 4-H Club, has chosen to pair the tunic she made with purchased navy capri leggings, turquoise shoes and turquoise earrings. In addition to her sewing, Name also looks forward to entering her foods and crafts projects at the fair next week.


4-Her’s name is ready for a night at the Symphony in her purchased navy and light blue high low dress. She wears blue and brown Aztec pattern wedges with the dress. Name completes the outfit with a layered blue jeweled necklace. This is Name’s eighth year in 4-H. She is a member of the Pioneer 4-H club and the Douglas County 4-H Ambassadors. Name is looking forward to showing her sheep and dogs at the fair. This fall she will be a sophomore at Saint Thomas Aquinas high school. She enjoys playing field hockey and participating in her school’s key club. Good luck at the fair, Name!


4-Her’s name, from the Eager Beavers 4-H Club, is ready to head to the beach in this rhythmic sundress which she constructed. She loves the bright colors and light weight of the cotton fabric. She can easily add a jean jacket to transition from fun under the sun to a casual night out. Sandals and sunglasses complete the easy going look. Name is ready for fun in the sun! This will be Name’s last fair as a 4-Her. She will be a sophomore at Kansas State this fall studying occupational therapy.


Name, 12, with the Rosehill Rustlers 4-H Club, wanted a challenge this year. And, oh boy, she got one! Name dreamed of making a wool coat last fall and she was excited to find some red wool exactly like she wanted. This fitted, lined coat has princess seams, a collar, side pockets, and bound button holes to finish out the coat. Name’s challenge this year was the bound buttonholes and all the hand sewing! She did an “Oz” some job on her coat and can’t wait to wear it this fall and winter. At the last minute she decided to make an ear muff to complete her outfit. Way to go Name!


Name, a second year member of the Pioneers 4-H Club, is having a great time this year as the fair is kicked off with his buymanship project. Fashion headlines are not the only thing on his mind as he is stepping out in the John Deere Green. Tonight he is wearing a blue and green plaid long sleeve button up shirt, with stone washed jeans. He is ready to show his goats in his cowboy boots, green and white hat and belt buckle. He enjoys helping on the farm and hopes to be a farmer when he grows up. Great start Name!

An informative 4-H style review narration can be a great aid to both the model and the audience. The narrator can use it to tell the model when to appear on stage, what fashion details to emphasize and when to leave the stage. The commentary can also be used to tell the audience the model’s name, the garment style, the special features of the garment and other interesting features.


In general, it is a wise idea to write a light, lively and informative description. The following suggestions may be helpful in writing an imaginative 4-H narration.
1. Remember that the commentary, which should have an opening, middle and conclusion. It should not be longer than the length of the time the model is on stage.
Usually the model walks to center stage, goes to each side and exits the stage.
2. Descriptions of a style review should begin with a lead sentence introducing the model by name, his or her town and is followed by a general description of the outfit. This
sentence is the most important and should be snappy to catch the audience’s attention.
3. Tell more than what the audience can readily see, however, people are usually more interested in what they can’t see.
4. Use questions as well as “fashion? Adjectives, words and catchy, active phrases like “Stepping out is . . . “and “Ready for . . . “.
5. Include what the model has leaned about the selection or the construction techniques, the accessories she/he selected, the original idea the model used in techniques and trims and the 4-H background and special interest of the model.
6. Include information about the garment, for example, how it reflects the current fashion scene, its fiber and fabric content, the amount of money saved by sewing the outfit and the special advantages or features of the garment, such as where it could be worn, its versatility and ease of care, etc.
7. Mention the leader’s name so that she/he will receive the recognition they deserve.
8. A narration in tune with the theme of the show helps to set the mood. A good example is complementing the following theme, “Color My World” by saying “Suzie has added a bright dimension to her wardrobe by choosing to make a scarlet red skirt. Her snowy white cowl neck sweater is color coordinated to accent the A-line skirt” . . . instead of “Suzie made a red skirt.”


To find examples of catchy words and phrases, look through magazines, catalogs, cosmetic brochures, etc., for help and use your imagination. The following words may give you some ideas:
*feminine     *snappy     *eye-catching    *luscious     *classic cut     *versatile    *appealing     *fresh     *jazzy
*neatly tailored     *glittery      *tartan plaid    *casual     *elegant     *creative    *striking     *multi-purpose     *natural     *complementary    *spirited      *delicate
*formal     *old-fashioned     *pale    *tiered      *attention getter     *basic    *soft     *teamed with     *subtle    *finishing touch     *wear ability     *flashy    *crisp      *lavish      *frilly    *simple      *Victorian      *lacy    *mid-calf     *street length      *focus on . .     *gleamy     *textured      *crinkly    *nostalgic     *seasonal     *intimate
*practical     *smooth     *boxy      *sensational     *rolled sleeves     *separate ways


Other catchy phrases that could be used are “ . . . can wear anytime, anywhere”, “for after five”, “easy to care for”, “ a real winner”, “easy to wear”, “romantic as a garden in spring”, “ . . . has so much going for it”, “to put it all together”, “mad about plaid”, “a girl’s best friend”, “ to
‘top’ it off”, “classic – here today and here tomorrow”, “ a big sweater for little evenings”, “sprinkled with flowers”, “for the career women”, “looking good from top to toe”, “new blazer shapes get double takes”, “best-dressed list”, “takes a new twist” and “simple but elegant”.
Catalogs and magazines are also good to check for examples of color adjectives you could use.


Another good source is the color chards of car and paint dealers, along with yarn companies.
The following descriptions may be helpful in making up 4-H commentaries:
White- creamy white, antique white, pearl white, snowy white, pure white, vanilla
Beige- neutral, fawn colored, tawny, buff, natural, camel,
khaki
Brown- chocolate brown, taupe tweed, cinnamon, coffee brown, walnut, spicy brown, cla.y
Orange- russet, apricot, peach, coral, rust, desert tortoise,
autumn rust, brick, copper, burnt orange
Green- lush green, mint green, campus green, lime green, emerald green, Kelly green, nile green, moss, field green,
avocado, olive, summer green, shamrock, 4-H green, jade green, Spartan green, apple green
Blue- royal blue, powder blue, teal blue, turquoise, sky blue, Monaco blue, aqua, misty blue, parakeet blue,
Copenhagen, blue denim
Purple- plum, violet, lavender, orchid, wine, fuchsia, grape
Yellow- sunny lemon, golden yellow, maize, goldenrod, lemon yellow, sun yellow, chartreuse
Red- cherry red, scarlet, Christmas red, atom red, barberry red, burgundy, berry, ruby red
Pink- sugar pink, rose, pale raspberry, dusty pink
Blends- tartan plain, flower-strewn, rainbow colors, pastels


The following commentaries may provide some insights into what can be said at your 4-H fashion/style review:
1. Ready for school is Mary Model, a first year 4-H member from Kalamazoo. Her denim skirt is the popular wrap style is easy to wear and was fun to make. Mary learned to put
on a waistband and finish seams during her project. Today she chose a bandanna print blouse to accompany her skirt for a fresh country look.
2. One thing Mary Model knows she can depend on is a gray flannel suit. Her designer blazer with a notched collar and welt pockets is a good investment of her sewing time.
The fully lined skirt is accentuated by box pleats. Today she completed the look with a burgundy blouse. Of course, with this suit she has many fashion options; a soft mohair sweater or a pretty pastel blouse would look terrific. Mary is a senior at Lansing High School and intends to be a nurse. Thank you Mary.
3. Stepping into the college scene, Martin Model of Lansing has chosen to war a versatile camel tweed jacket which is accented with deep pockets and false welts. It is also lined to give it a clean finish. The tie accents his sky blue shirt made of broadcloth. As a finishing touch, Martin has added a pair of classic cut chocolate brown pants with scoop pockets. Besides Martin’s interest in clothing, he is also active in baseball and hockey.

Tips for modeling
When your sewing/buymanship project is finished, you are ready to show others what you have made or
purchased. If you have good posture, poise, and confidence, you’ll do a better job of showing others your
finished projects.
Good posture is the first step in effective modeling. Standing with good posture, you should be able to “see”
an imaginary straight line from the bottom of your ear down to your ankle. It’s important to stand tall with your
head erect, chest and rib cage high, stomach flat and knees relaxed. Keep your weight balanced on both feet.
Relax your arms at your sides.

Modeling for the Judges
Walk
• Your walk reveals shyness or confidence.
• Practice with the shoes you will wear for the Fashion Revue.
• Walk with poise. Reach with your front foot; push with your back foot.
Arms
• Keep arms loose and easy, hanging close to the body.
• To give an uncluttered view of the garment, keep your hands away from the front and back of your body.
Smile
• Smile! A warm, happy smile can make you feel better and can be a personal greeting to the people you meet.
Pivot – a turn models use when walking the runway to show all sides of the garment


Good Modeling Skills
Girls:
For girls, the basic stance finds your feet in a “T” position.

2 O'clock position10 O'clock position
For the 10 o’clock position, the right foot is forward and weight on left foot. For 2 o’clock position, the left foot is
forward and weight on right foot. In both positions, feet should be pointing forwards.


To turn: for girls.
Half Pivot
1. Keep your feet in the basic stance. Transfer your weight to the balls of your feet for smoother turning and better balance.
2. With your weight on the balls of both feet, slowly rise so heels are slightly free from the floor.
3. Pivot in the direction of the back foot.
4. Pause
5. Pivot back to the original position. Toes never leave the floor.


Fashion Revue Tips
The suggestions below should help you prepare for the fashion revue. Remember that fashion is always
changing, and what was proper 5 years ago may not be appropriate today.
• Proper foundation garments should be worn but not seen.
• Shoe heel height should be appropriate for skirt length..
• Accessories should add to the total look for the outfit and not create a competing second look.
• If in doubt about appropriate lengths of skirts, or accessories, you may wish to refer to a fashion magazine. (Kansas trends are generally 3 years later.)
• Proper undergarments should be worn. Slips should always be worn with skirts,
especially long skirts.
• Wear your complete outfit: garment, shoes, foundation garments and accessories.
Practice modeling in these so you will be comfortable.
• Shoes need not be new but should be clean and recently polished.


Boys:
For boys, stand with your feet apart, squarely under your hips.
1. Step forward with right foot, make a half turn to the right, and bring left foot around. Your back will be to the
audience.
2. Step forward again with right foot, bringing left foot around. You will be facing the audience and will have
completed a full turn.
3. Step forward again on right foot and continue down runway.
There will be times that you will be modeling on a stage only and may be required to make a complete pivot
more than once.


Fashion Revue Tips
The suggestions below should help you prepare for the fashion revue. Remember that fashion is always
changing, and what was proper 5 years ago may not be appropriate today.
• When wearing pants with belt loops, always wear a belt. Especially when wearing a shirt
or sweater, you need to wear a belt. Belts just make an outfit look polished and well put
together.
• Jacket Length - sleeve length should come to the bony knot on the wrist when the arm is
down at the side. Shirt cuffs should be ½ inch longer than thumbs are down.
• Slacks - back of hem should touch back of sole and angle up in front. Cuffed slacks are
straight. Straight slacks should always have longer break in front than cuffed slacks.
• Boots are only appropriate if they suit the style of the garment.
• Older boys (over 11) should wear hand-tied ties. No clip-ons.
• Tie tacks should be worn if appropriate. Refer to a fashion magazine for reference.
• Don’t wear both a belt and suspenders.
Belts should match your shoes.
• Socks should match your trousers.
• Wear your complete outfit: garment, shoes, foundation garments and accessories.
Practice modeling in these so you will be comfortable.
• Shoes need not be new but should be clean and recently polished.

Here are some common questions judges may ask at the Style Revue for Buymanship and Clothing Construction.


1. Occasion or Need of outfit purchased
2. Fabric: Content________________________________
3. What will you do with this garment/outfit when you are done with it?
4. Describe how you have or will care for the garment/outfit.
5. How do you see this garment/outfit as it compliments your body style and its suitability to your wardrobe needs?
6. Calculate the estimated cost per wear of this garment?
7. Why did you choose this outfit?
8. What wise consumer decisions did you look for when choosing this outfit?
9. Why did you select these colors?
10. Why did you take this project?
11. How much experience did you have before you started this project?
12. What did you like most about the project?
13. What did you like least about this project?
14. What new things did you learn?
15. How can you use parts of your outfit with other items in your wardrobe

Quilt or Quilted Item Contest Details:

Contest is open to any quilt, quilted wall hanging, or quilted item and may be hand quilted, machine quilted or tied. Senior entries must be completed 100% by the 4-H member including quilting and finishing in order to qualify for Montana 4-H Congress Quilt Contest. Quilt entries must be accompanied by an informational description of the quilt pattern or design, description of quilt technique used, and any other pertinent information (fabric information and color theory, for example).

Please note: Quilts are still considered textiles - but will be displayed and judged during the Art Portion of the Competition Day, not the Fashion Revue.